Chasing The Minimum

Coaching isn’t a competition to see how much you can cram into a session.

 

“Value” in coaching isn’t determined by how much homework you assign; how much extra time you allow before class; or how much new knowledge you impart.

 

Your clients aren’t looking for “more”.

 

They’re looking for “less”.

 

They’re asking, “What’s the minimum amount of time I can spend to get my results?”

 

I was once visiting a gym with new, excited coaches. They were eager to share their vast knowledge with their clients. So the class started with a dynamic warmup, and then a rollout on the foam rollers, and then static stretching, and then a specific warmup, and then movement demo, and then–you know how it goes. At the one-hour mark, the real workout was just about to begin. The guy on my left turned to me and whispered,

“I gotta go pick up my kids. I thought CrossFit was an hour.”

 

He didn’t come back.

 

New writers, new salesmen, and new coaches tend to vomit on their audience.

 

They think “more is better”.

 

They try to fill the hour, fill the page, fill the client’s head with facts.

 

And when they do, they usually forget what the client wants: less.

 

Many good books would have made a great blog post.

 

Many good blog posts should have been tweet.

 

Many 90-minute classes could have accomplished the same thing in 45.

 

Given the choice, your clients would always do it in half the time.

 

One of the ways to grow as a coach is to ask yourself, “How can I make this simpler?”

 

“How can I get the client to their goal one week faster?”

“How can I accomplish the same workout with less equipment?”

“How can I explain Macro tracking in 500 words instead of 1000?”

“How can I define my service in 10 words or less?”

“How can I build aerobic capacity in less time?”

“What can I cut from this workout and still get the same result?”

 

I’m not saying to cut your class times short. I AM saying that you can accomplish everything you need to do with a client–and more–in an hour.

 

The greatest coaches and mentors seek the fastest path to excellence. They don’t pile more on top; they cut, relentlessly, until they find the best results for the minimum viable effort.

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