Movement Faults, Part 2

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If you didn’t read the first blog about movement faults, check it out here before proceeding.

Ok, as a recap here is the homework you had:

 

Step 1: Get out a blank sheet of paper

Step 2: Write down 10 things you can do to make sure John gets a 10/10 coaching experience at your gym

Step 3: Close this post and come back tomorrow for the next step.

 

Here’s the next thing I want you to do: count how many things that you listed would be classified as fixing a movement fault. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

 

In my experience as a coach myself, a builder of new coaches, and an improver of veteran coaches, I feel confident in saying that more than half of your list is full of movement fixes. The industry has definitely taken a massive shift in the past decade toward finding faults and correcting them at any cost.

 

Video recording is common. Apps like ‘Coaches Eye’ have taken video review to an absurd level. Want to watch your knees cave in at 2 degrees per second? Let me fire up this app!

 

(No, this is not some grumpy old man reeling against technology.)

 

Let me tell you what I’ve learned the hard way: if you find a fault with someone’s movement every day they come in, they’re probably going to quit. 

 

Yes, there are nice and positive ways to do it. 

 

Yes, maybe your client needs thicker skin. 

 

I’ve worked with Olympians, professional baseball players, CrossFit Games athletes, and even the youngest kid to ever become a pro soccer player (google: Freddy Adu). They have skin that is plenty thick and yet I learned that the quickest way to lose the buy-in of a pro is just to harp on how they’re moving wrong.

 

Its still true: no matter the client, no matter the goal – if you fill the majority of your coaching time pointing out what your client is doing wrong, they’ll get tired of it and never come back. 

 

This is often disguised another way: you telling them what they could be doing better. If you have kids, you understand this implicitly. They know when you try to tell them ‘not good enough’ by saying ‘Ooo little Johnny, here’s how you can do this better next time!”

 

Now we’re going to run a new exercise:

 

Step 1: Get out a blank sheet of paper

Step 2: Write down 10 things you can do to make sure John gets a 10/10 coaching experience at your gym

Step 3: Close this post and come back tomorrow for the next step. And the last post in this series.

 

*Caveat – none of the things you write can be related in any way, shape, form, or fashion to correct movement.

 

You want bonus points? Email me your list ([email protected]), I’d love to see what you wrote this second time around!

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